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Fireflies in Southern Michigan

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a night of fireflies
has arrived…
my spring-planted willow ~ Issa

Photographer: Ken Scott; Ken’s Web site
Summary Author: Ken Scott; Jim Foster

Shown above on this long exposure (40 minute) is a flock of fireflies on a midsummer’s eve, beneath a starry sky as observed near Willis, Michigan. With dimming light after sunset, fireflies (also called glow worms or lightning bugs) emerge from their daytime lair in grassy lawns, meadows and tree canopies. Initially they cling close to the ground but tend to drift higher up — though rarely above the tree tops. As the sky darkens their blinking bioluminescent glow, used to attract mates or prey, seems to increase. Note the lone fire-walker; seemingly daring others to cross its yellow-green line. Photo taken on July 19, 2014.

 

 

http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2014/08/fireflies-in-southern-michigan.html


Saint Petersburg ~ Church of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ ~ Church of the Savior on the Spilled Blood

Church of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ is known to Petersburgers as the Church of the Savior on the Spilled Blood – or even just the Church on the Blood – as it marks the spot where Alexander II was fatally wounded in an assassination attempt on March 1, 1881. Designed by Alfred Parland in the style of 16th and 17th-century Russian churches, the Church of the Resurrection provides a stark (some would say jarring) contrast to its surroundings of Baroque, Classical and Modernist architecture.

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Alexander II died of wounds inflicted in an attack by the terrorist group People’s Will. Immediately, his heir, Alexander III, declared his intention to erect a church on the site in his father’s memory, and moreover to have this church built in “traditional Russian” style – in distinction to what he saw as the contaminating Western influence of Petersburg.

http://www.saint-petersburg.com/cathedrals/church-resurrection-jesus-christ.asp

SAVIOR ON THE SPILLED BLOOD
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Savior on the Spilled Blood is an architectural landmark of central St Petersburg, and a unique monument to Alexander II the Liberator.

It features Russia’s largest collection of mosaics (over 7,000 sq.m.), Italian coloured marbles, decorative stones from the Urals and Altai region, as well as a collection of Russian heraldic mosaics.

http://eng.cathedral.ru/spasa_na_krovi/

 

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Libyan Aseeda (عصيدة) Recipe


Arabic Boiled Flour Pudding: Asida العصيدة

Asida is a boiled flour pudding cooked directly in water. It is a popular traditional dish served in Libya during celebrations such as births or Eid. It is made of wheat flour or whole-meal flour dough cooked in water, and is eaten with honey or date syrup and melted butter. Some people use olive oil or samn (ghee) instead of butter. It is usually eaten for breakfast. Like bazeen, asida is a communal meal served in a large flat plate or gas’a, and it is generally eaten with the fingers, although spoons can be used. While Bazeen has Amazigh origins and is a purely North African dish, this boiled flour pudding has an Arabic name and versions of Asida are made in the Arabian Peninsula.

Take a look at the steps for the smiley face asida for children.

Ingredients
Serves 4

25g butter
1tsp salt
300g flour
1 litre boiling water

Served with:
Honey or date syrup
Melted butter or ghee

Fill a deep pot with 1/2 litre hot water. Add 25g butter and a teaspoon of salt.

Leave on medium heat until the water starts to boil.

Sift the flour then pour it into the pan all at once then remove from heat.

Immediately start to stir the flour into the buttery water.

Press the dough against the side of the pot to remove lumps.


Devil Woman

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Vittorio De Seta 1954 – Lu Tempu Di Li Pisci Spata

 

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Miniature Donkeys are the CUTEST Things Ever

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The miniature donkeys at the Amelia Rise Donkey farm in Australia are some of the cutest creatures on this earth. They are small, they are happy and they are fuzzy.

Prepare for your blood pressure to be lowered and your day to be brightened:

http://www.viralnova.com/cute-miniature-donkeys/


Iranians celebrate Persian New Year

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Iranians are celebrating Norouz which marks the beginning of the Persian New Year.

Norouz, which means New Day, has been celebrated annually for at least 3,000 years. It is one of the oldest and most cherished festivities in Iran.

The UNESCO has recognized the occasion as an “intangible cultural heritage of Persian origin.”

Spring is considered by many nations as a symbol of rebirth when flowers bloom and nature casts a green spell of fresh vitality.

In Iran and many other countries people welcome spring with the ancient Norouz celebrations which coincides with the astronomical Vernal Equinox Day or the first day of spring.

Norouz is the first of Farvardin, the first month of the Persian calendar which falls on March 21.

Now people in Azerbaijan, India, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan mark the Persian New Year on the same day with various types of festivities such as games, songs and dances.

For Iranians, Norouz is a celebration of renewal and change, a time to visit relatives and friends, and pay respect to senior family members. They prepare to welcome the New Year days before by spring cleaning and buying new clothes.

After celebrating the festival of fire, Iranians start preparing the Haft Seen, a table with seven items starting with the letter ‘S,’ which is set to welcome the Persian New Year.

Apart from the main Haft Seen items, people also put the holy Qur’an in hopes of being blessed by God in the coming year.

Mirror, goldfish, eggs, dried nuts and fruits, candles, coins, hyacinth, and milk are also among the items Iranians include in their Haft Seen.

The whole table is a thanksgiving table for all the good bestowed by God, and symbolizes light, warmth, life, love, joy, production, prosperity, and nature.

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http://www.islamicinvitationturkey.com/2014/03/20/iranians-celebrate-persian-new-year/


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